The Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

 

 

The Lyda Hill Texas Collection of Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America Project, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

Preservation Brief 46: The Preservation and Reuse of Historic Gas Stations

AIA Continuing Education System Quiz

The following quiz assesses understanding of the information contained in the U.S. National Park Service's Preservation Brief on preserving and reusing historic gas stations. The Brief, authored by Chad Randl, is part of an ongoing series that provides guidance on preserving, rehabilitating, and restoring historic buildings.

The fifty Preservation Briefs cover a wide range of topics; many contain information relevant to non-historic as well as historic buildings. They are a valuable resource for architects and other professionals working in preservation, as well as the renovation, repair, and maintenance of non-historic buildings. The quiz is a collaborative project of the AIA Historic Resources Committee and HPEF.

The brief is available on the National Park Service website. Print copies can be purchased for a nominal fee from the U.S. Government Printing Office

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Read the Preservation Brief 46 text, then return to this page and complete all questions below. Submit the quiz using the button at the end. A score of 80 percent or above entitles the participant to 1.25 Health, Safety & Welfare learning unit hours (1.25 HSW LU Hours). Certificates of completion will be issued via email. Contact info@hpef.us with questions, comments, or technical issues.

 
 
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1) In the 1920s and 30s, companies designed gas stations to resemble house forms... *
2) A gas station’s current interior layout may contribute to the building’s historic character… *
3) Despite the utilitarian, industrial character of many historic gas stations they require the same approach and attention to cleaning and maintenance as other historic structures. *
4) The following features on a historic gas station may be replaced without considering their historic character: *
5) Continuing to use a historic gas station for its original function precludes the possibility of altering and updating the structure. *
6) Historic gas stations are often attractive properties for new reuses unrelated to gas and automobiles because: *
7) Gas station restoration projects… *
8) Which of the following describes an appropriate treatment for historic gas station windows: *
9) All of the following are generally appropriate interior treatments for historic gas stations, except: *
10) Surviving historic features such as lighting fixtures, planters, and pump islands are important to the character of the site and should be retained whenever possible. *